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Revenue’s consultants tax compliance programme yields €74 million

The Revenue Commissioners yielded €6,920,868 last year under its medical consultants tax compliance programme, a reduction from €11,162,468 in 2017, according to figures it has released to the Medical Independent (MI).

The total yield to the end of last year was €74,047,077, which has involved the closure of 660 cases since 2013.

The figure includes €40,219,555 in tax, €21,017,017 in uplift (estimated tax receipts saved or which will be collected in future years as a result of carrying out the intervention), €7,917,422 in interest and €4,893,084 in penalties.

“Revenue is satisfied that the medical consultants compliance programme has identified, addressed and is continuing to address relevant risks in respect of the tax affairs of medical consultants. This is an ongoing sectoral programme in the context of Revenue’s overall compliance framework and strategy,” a Revenue spokesperson told MI.

The highest annual amount recouped since the programme began was €21,608,125 in 2015.

By the end of 2018, Revenue had opened 777 interventions under this programme, and as of the end of February 2019, there were 117 open interventions at various stages of completion.

“We previously advised that 829 cases were opened over the period 2013 to 30 June 2017,” added Revenue’s spokesperson. “A review of 87 of these cases found that no further intervention (audit/aspect query/profile interview) in the context of this programme was needed.”

As of the end of 2018, some 39 cases had been published in the quarterly list of tax defaulters.

Meanwhile, as of 28 February last, there were appeals relating to 35 consultants ongoing at the Tax Appeals Commission, which is an independent statutory body.

Revenue initiated a review of the tax affairs of consultants in the Dublin region in 2010, following concerns about a tax planning strategy being promoted to the medical profession. Following an initial review of cases to ascertain the issues and risks involved, the project was expanded to the tax affairs of consultants nationally in 2013. The main focus of the programme has been to address the tax issues arising from the incorporation of consultants’ businesses.

The Taxes Consolidation Act, 1997 allows a Revenue officer to disclose taxpayer information to a professional body where he or she is satisfied that the work of a financial agent does not meet the standards of a professional body. Revenue’s spokesperson said such referral is considered in cases of significant and/or repeated non-adherence to professional standards. To date, there has not been any referral by Revenue arising from this programme.

he Revenue Commissioners yielded €6,920,868 last year under its medical consultants tax compliance programme, a reduction from €11,162,468 in 2017, according to figures it has released to the Medical Independent (MI).

The total yield to the end of last year was €74,047,077, which has involved the closure of 660 cases since 2013.

The figure includes €40,219,555 in tax, €21,017,017 in uplift (estimated tax receipts saved or which will be collected in future years as a result of carrying out the intervention), €7,917,422 in interest and €4,893,084 in penalties.

“Revenue is satisfied that the medical consultants compliance programme has identified, addressed and is continuing to address relevant risks in respect of the tax affairs of medical consultants. This is an ongoing sectoral programme in the context of Revenue’s overall compliance framework and strategy,” a Revenue spokesperson told MI.

The highest annual amount recouped since the programme began was €21,608,125 in 2015.

By the end of 2018, Revenue had opened 777 interventions under this programme, and as of the end of February 2019, there were 117 open interventions at various stages of completion.

“We previously advised that 829 cases were opened over the period 2013 to 30 June 2017,” added Revenue’s spokesperson. “A review of 87 of these cases found that no further intervention (audit/aspect query/profile interview) in the context of this programme was needed.”

As of the end of 2018, some 39 cases had been published in the quarterly list of tax defaulters.

Meanwhile, as of 28 February last, there were appeals relating to 35 consultants ongoing at the Tax Appeals Commission, which is an independent statutory body.

Revenue initiated a review of the tax affairs of consultants in the Dublin region in 2010, following concerns about a tax planning strategy being promoted to the medical profession. Following an initial review of cases to ascertain the issues and risks involved, the project was expanded to the tax affairs of consultants nationally in 2013. The main focus of the programme has been to address the tax issues arising from the incorporation of consultants’ businesses.

The Taxes Consolidation Act, 1997 allows a Revenue officer to disclose taxpayer information to a professional body where he or she is satisfied that the work of a financial agent does not meet the standards of a professional body. Revenue’s spokesperson said such referral is considered in cases of significant and/or repeated non-adherence to professional standards. To date, there has not been any referral by Revenue arising from this programme.

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