Sign up now for ease of access to The Medical Independent, Ireland’s most frequently published medical newspaper, delivering award-winning news and investigative reporting.

  • receive the eCopy two days prior to the printed edition.
  • can partake in our online MCQs.
  • can enter our online sports quiz.


Medicalindependent.ie is Ireland's only investigative medical news website for doctors, healthcare professionals and anyone with an interest in health issues.

Established in 2010, along with its sister publication The Medical Independent, our stated aim is to investigate and analyse the major issues affecting healthcare and the medical profession in Ireland. The Medical Independent has won a number of awards for its investigative journalism, and its stories are frequently picked up by national digital, broadcast and print media. The Medical Independent is published by GreenCross Publishing.

Address: Top Floor, 111 Rathmines Road Lr, Dublin 6

Tel: 353 (01) 441 0024

GreenCross Publishing is owned by Graham Cooke.

You are reading 1 of 2 free-access articles allowed for 30 days

The challenge in defining acne and rosacea

By Mindo - 13th Mar 2019 | 129 views

Acne skin because the disorders of sebaceous glands productions Human skin Acne

The 22nd Primary Care Dermatology Society of Ireland (PCDSI) Annual Scientific Conference, which was held in the Galmont Hotel in Galway from 21-23 February, opened  with a special symposium on acne and rosacea.

Opening the event, GP and PCDSI Chairperson Dr Karen Reidy stated that acne and rosacea are common problems in general practice, but can often be difficult to diagnose and manage.

Consultant Dermatologist at the Mater Private Hospital, Dublin, Prof Frank Powell, who has a special interest in rosacea, was first to the podium.

He spoke on the topic ‘Rosacea — pathogenesis and clinical presentation’ and began by discussing the definition of rosacea.

The problem, he told delegates, is that people often have a vague notion of what rosacea actually is.

Commonly referred to as ‘redness in the face’, Prof Powell argued that the use of such a broad, wide-ranging term for the condition has perhaps resulted in several disorders of separate pathogenic pathways being diagnosed as rosacea.

He postulated that this has led to a poor understanding of the pathogenesis of the disorder and the lack of a structured approach to treatment.

He looked at the four subtypes of rosacea classified by the US National Rosacea Society, including erythematotelangiectatic (ETTR) rosacea, papulopustular (PPR) rosacea, phymatous rosacea  (also known as rhinophyma) and ocular rosacea.

Prof Powell noted that frequent flushing is a characteristic of ETTR but maintained that not all ‘flushers’ actually have rosacea.  Rosacea is more common in pale-skinned, blue-eyed individuals. Around 14 million have the condition in the US, while almost 3 per cent of people in Ireland have rosacea.

Common abnormalities of the sebaceous glands of the skin present in rosacea, Prof Powell noted.  Another theory regarding the pathogenesis suggests a significant association between demodex infestation and rosacea, Prof Powell also pointed out.

Leave a Reply

Latest
Latest Issue
The Medical Independent 19th May 2022

You need to be logged in to access this content. Please login or sign up using the links below.

Most Read